How to partition Kimsufi box for installation?


#1

I run a kimsufi box and the default set it 20g for root and rest in home. I want to run plex and sickrage on my box. DO I need to change any of that?

Edit: I did see the information about using the distro kernal so I am aware of that :slight_smile:


#2

If you cannot remove the /home directory and just force it all on the /(root) partition, then what you are doing is correct. I would suggest also taking a look at your /etc/fstab just for safe measure and verify that your /home ext4 line has errors=remount-ro instead of defaults.

I know @liara made a change to the initial setup in regards to the mount (which technically only matters if you want to install quotas - you can opt to use the whole system drive for disk space if you’re flying solo)

It’s listed here in the function block for _qmount:

function _qmount() {
  # Setup mount points for Quotas
  if [[ $quota == yes ]]; then
    if [[ $DISTRO == Ubuntu ]]; then
      if [[ ${primaryroot} == "root" ]]; then
        sed -ie '/\/ / s/defaults/usrjquota=aquota.user,jqfmt=vfsv1,defaults/' /etc/fstab
        sed -i 's/errors=remount-ro/usrjquota=aquota.user,jqfmt=vfsv1,errors=remount-ro/g' /etc/fstab
        apt-get install -y linux-image-extra-virtual quota >>"${OUTTO}" 2>&1
        mount -o remount / || mount -o remount /home >>"${OUTTO}" 2>&1
        quotacheck -auMF vfsv1 >>"${OUTTO}" 2>&1
        quotaon -uv / >>"${OUTTO}" 2>&1
        service quota start >>"${OUTTO}" 2>&1
      else
        sed -ie '/\/home/ s/defaults/usrjquota=aquota.user,jqfmt=vfsv1,defaults/' /etc/fstab
        sed -i 's/errors=remount-ro/usrjquota=aquota.user,jqfmt=vfsv1,errors=remount-ro/g' /etc/fstab
        apt-get install -y linux-image-extra-virtual quota >>"${OUTTO}" 2>&1
        mount -o remount /home >>"${OUTTO}" 2>&1
        quotacheck -auMF vfsv1 >>"${OUTTO}" 2>&1
        quotaon -uv /home >>"${OUTTO}" 2>&1
        service quota start >>"${OUTTO}" 2>&1
      fi
    elif [[ $DISTRO == Debian ]]; then
      if [[ ${primaryroot} == "root" ]]; then
        sed -ie '/\/ / s/defaults/usrjquota=aquota.user,jqfmt=vfsv1,defaults/' /etc/fstab
        sed -i 's/errors=remount-ro/usrjquota=aquota.user,jqfmt=vfsv1,errors=remount-ro/g' /etc/fstab
        apt-get install -y quota >>"${OUTTO}" 2>&1
        mount -o remount / || mount -o remount /home >>"${OUTTO}" 2>&1
        quotacheck -auMF vfsv1 >>"${OUTTO}" 2>&1
        quotaon -uv / >>"${OUTTO}" 2>&1
        service quota start >>"${OUTTO}" 2>&1
      else
        sed -ie '/\/home/ s/defaults/usrjquota=aquota.user,jqfmt=vfsv1,defaults/' /etc/fstab
        sed -i 's/errors=remount-ro/usrjquota=aquota.user,jqfmt=vfsv1,errors=remount-ro/g' /etc/fstab
        apt-get install -y quota >>"${OUTTO}" 2>&1
        mount -o remount /home >>"${OUTTO}" 2>&1
        quotacheck -auMF vfsv1 >>"${OUTTO}" 2>&1
        quotaon -uv /home >>"${OUTTO}" 2>&1
        service quota start >>"${OUTTO}" 2>&1
      fi
    fi
    touch /install/.quota.lock
  fi
}

#3

So you feel that I should attempt to remove home and just use root? I am a little confused by what you just told me about the /home and the code you pasted. Sorry for being a little dumb :stuck_out_tongue:

Edit: I can put everything on root, Also how big of a swap do I want? kimsufi just has 512mb as default. Please let me know what the best thing for me to do is


#4

No no no… nothing dumb there… I’m just an uber geek. :stuck_out_tongue_winking_eye:

I would suggest, if you can… remove the entire /home mount as it is not needed for seedbox systems… or any systems for that matter. It’s like the whale, they used to be land mammals, now they swim in the sea… but they still have a vestigial pelvis from the days of old.

As per the Swap… keep it low, typically we do not want to use Swap as memory will be a bottleneck on your system. PHP 7.0-fpm and memcached do a fairly decent job of keeping resources pooled nicely. So yeah… low and remove /home and you’ve already made clear you know about distribution kernels.

Win/Win

If anything goes wrong… we’re here for you!


#5

hahaha well my system has 8gb of ram, Is the default 512mb of swap just fine?


#6

Yes, 512 will suffice :slight_smile:


#7

You’re the best! So helpful! Just a weird quick question, For a single user I dont need quotas, correct? Also do I even need ffempg or whatever that screenshot software is? Also logs? haha sorry if im a pain!


#8

The log file I would keep, it basically just keeps a log (that you can delete afterwards) of the install. In the event anything goes wrong, you can submit it to us for review and find a patch for you.

If you are planning on using the server yourself, I would absolutely NOT use quotas… there just isn’t any need.

I usually install ffmpeg regardless, just b/c… Plex etc may fallback on it and it’s typically just handy to have on the system. Doesn’t add bloat or anything, just tends to take a bit to compile on the system.


#9

Well thank you very much! I’m excited to install the script on my system. Its honestly so refreshing to have the community come together for the greater good, Some seed box providers probably hate that you’re providing us such a good solution :stuck_out_tongue:


#10

I agree! It is nice to have the community rally around a solution like QuickBox. We wouldn’t be here without everybody that installs it and asks their questions etc.

Some providers may feel that way, but then they will always get their love via support, managed systems and them having top tier networks and tuned OSes for their members. Some even use QuickBox as their users dashboards… and we love them for it! :smile:

Thanks for trying out QuickBox! Don’t be a stranger here on the forums and hopefully once you got QuickBox installed you’ll setup Quassel or ZNC and we’ll see you in IRC :wink:


#11

I’m familiar with ZNC but what is Quassel? I’ve always just used Mirc to connect to my bouncer :stuck_out_tongue:


#12

Quassel is another IRC bouncer, literally nothing to configure. However, I too use ZNC… so if you’re comfortable with configuring that (b/c I love Hex Chat) then you’ll be alright sticking to your guns. Quassel, though it requires 0 config does require that you download their Quassel Desktop Client, so it does not work with other third party clients.


#13

Oh very interesting! Yea ZNC is so easy to configure, but I can see the appeal of something like Quassel!


#14

Yeah, it’s a nice way for those new to setting up and using IRC and clients to get their feet wet and feel like pros while their at it. Lot’s of Quassel lovers round these parts.


#15

Hey, I just had a quick question! I just installed the script and it went beautifully, One question. Is it normal for 95gb to be used after installation? That seems quite high


#16

It’s mainly the OS is going to take up space on install. QuickBox itself with all files sits only at 52MB in size. It basically factors in the total usage of space on the array/disk.


#17

Ubuntu 16.04 takes up almost 100gb?


#18

Depends on the provider, but it wouldn’t be out of the ordinary once all dependencies etc are installed.


#19

Well I am using kimsufi, That just seems insane, Does windows even take up 95gb? lol


#20

Yeah, before you add anything you can run this from the / directory.

cd /
for i in G M K; do du -ah | grep [0-9]$i | sort -nr -k 1; done | head -n 11

You may get some error can’t access on return, but it will display for you the top 10 largest files.

####Edit: this may be a friendlier command

cd
find / -xdev -type f -size +100M -exec du -sh {} ';' | sort -rh | head -n50

Top 50

Just to add further emphasis on this topic as I know others may be curious. When I said OS I guess it was very vague in regards to what I was attempting to explain. I’ll add a little Wiki/FAQ post about this in more detail soon as in that area I do slack.

So here is one of the big Questions and a little explanation.

####Q: Why does my disk show so much space being used after install?

####A: Your system (Linux) is using a system of Reserved Blocks. See below for full details:

Reserving some number of filesystem blocks for use by privileged processes is done to avoid filesystem fragmentation, and to allow system daemons, such as syslogd(8), to continue to function correctly after non-privileged processes are prevented from writing to the filesystem.

It also acts as a failsafe; if for some reason the normal users and their programs fill up the disk up to 100%, you might not even be able to login and/or sync files before deleting them. By reserving some blocks to root, the system ensures you can always correct the situation.

In practice, 5% is an old default and may be too much if your hard drive is big enough. You can change that value using the tune2fs tool, but be sure to read its man page first by typing man tune2fs

To use the tune2fs tool, type as root tune2fs